California’s At-Risk Urban Forests

The 177 million trees in California’s urban forests are at-risk as state-mandated water cuts start to significantly reduce irrigation vital to mostly non-native, ornamental trees.  For context of the threat, 12 million native trees in California’s wildlands have died due to the extended drought.

Mobile GIS For Better Managing Urban Forests (video)

  Dudek’s urban forestry practice manager Michael Huff explains how a real-time mobile GIS app makes managing urban forests more efficient and cost-effective.  [VIDEO] Gathering and distributing GIS field data traditionally has been a complex, lengthy and manual process. Now, Dudek urban foresters use the Kerata real-time mobile data management application to collect data more…

Treating Drought-Stressed California Oaks

  While California’s oak trees are well adapted to survive the state’s drought, the right approach to supplemental irrigation is critical to prevent pests from taking advantage of drought-stressed oaks. Oaks will reallocate resources to conserve water to sustain basic physiological functions. But that can lower the trees’ defenses against disease and insects, including borer…

Interactive GIS System Improves Urban Forest Management

  Dudek’s GIS-based Tree Resource Information Management (TRIM) is a web-based interactive mapping  tool and database with a simple-to-use interface to view, query, track and manage urban forest assets more efficiently and accurately. TRIM is a one-stop information source for managing urban forests ranging in size from a few hundred trees to tens of thousands…

Assessing Cumulative Development Impacts on Fire Services

  A recent focus in San Diego County on assessing fire services based on the cumulative impacts of proposed large developments may start to be seen elsewhere in California.  Development of large solar farms in San Diego’s rural eastern area prompted resource agencies to ask for more comprehensive fire service assessments, said Michael Huff, Dudek’s…

Smart Fuel Modification Saves Money, Avoids Fines

  Effectively reducing wildfire hazards requires a four-step approach: Assessing potential risks Developing a plan to reduce risks Implementing the plan Performing regular maintenance. Proper execution, however, is laced with nuances. Resource agencies and fire departments agree that there should be, at a minimum, 100 feet of defensible space between structures and the natural, unmodified…

© Dudek 2012. All rights reserved. Please visit us at Dudek.com